aba events

Highlights from 2015 Camp Colorado: A Photo-Video Essay

I got to spend July 6-12, 2015 in the field in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado with twenty-two young… [read more]

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ABA Checklist Committee Adds Rufous-necked Wood-Rail to ABA Checklist

The ABA Checklist Committee (hereafter, CLC) recently voted 8–0 to accept the Rufous-necked Wood-Rail… [read more]

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New Mexico’s Dale Zimmerman receives ABA Ludlow Griscom Award

Dale Zimmerman of Silver City, New Mexico, one of his state’s best known and admired biologists and… [read more]

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Photo Quiz, sort of: April 2015 Birding

First things first. The April 2015 Birding has gone to press, and members will be getting their copies… [read more]

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Announcing the American Birding Association 2015 Awards

The ABA Board of Directors recently voted to make five presentations of ABA Awards in 2015. The awardees… [read more]

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Announcing the 2015 ABA Bird of the Year! / ¡Presentando al ABA Ave del Año del 2015!

We bid a fond farewell to our friend the Rufous Hummingbird, and turn our eyes towards 2015's standard… [read more]

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Nikon Monarch 7

Open Mic: Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel(s) in California

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At the Mic: Steve N.G. Howell

Bodega Bay, an hour or so north of San Francisco, California, is the best place on the West Coast, indeed, in North America, for pelagic birding. Yet not many birding trips go out of there—go figure. Thus, some friends and I charter a 6-pack fishing boat each year and do a few trips, splitting the cost equally and having a leaderless trip, taking photos, shooting the breeze, enjoying the ocean. In recent years we’ve seen Steller’s (Short-tailed) Albatross three times, and even a White-chinned Petrel, along with local rarities like Least Storm-Petrel and Brown Booby, although the latter is becoming almost expected.

Last weekend we did three trips out of Bodega Bay (21-23 August 2015), and perhaps it wasn’t that surprising when we found a Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel with the thousands of storm-petrels that raft up near Cordell Bank. After all, the media is crying “El Niño,” and back in the spring on the nearby Farallon Islands biologists caught and banded 2 Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels (P. Warzybok, pers. comm.). Still, with only about 10 records in North America, it’s a rare bird up here, although it’s common off Mexico, as close as the tip of the Baja California peninsula.

The first “sighting,” on Saturday, wasn’t, if that makes sense. It was a classic “oops, this looks like a Wedge-rumped” as I went through my photos in the evening! The bird was right at the edge of a huge line of birds, barely in the frame; but the preceding image showed a better angle and confirmed the first impression (Figures 1-2, with a Wilson’s to the right, among the Fork-tailed and Ashy storm-petrels, and 3 Wilson’s in the big frame). Well, that rhymes with duck (as in luck, of the not so good kind), was the conclusion of my fellow birders, who this time comprised Kenneth Petersen, Dave Pereksta, Tom Blackman, Bruce Rideout, and Scott Somershoe.

01a Bodega Bay pelagic, CA (248 of 320)-Edit

01 Bodega Bay pelagic, CA (248 of 320) The first sign there was a Wedge-rumped—the bird is at the far left of the full frame image, but cropped it shows just fine.

The preceding image on the camera shows the bird at a different angle, solidifying the gut feeling from the first image. But that was all we got the first day!

The preceding image on the camera shows the bird at a different angle, solidifying the gut feeling from the first image. But that was all we got the first day!

But the next day conditions were good and we headed back to the spot, and by late morning we were surrounded by rafts of storm-petrels—looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack. We keyed in on white-rumped birds sitting in the flocks (there were 50+ Wilson’s among 5-6000 Ashy and 4-5000 Fork-tailed, along with 50+ Black Storm-Petrels) and, amazingly, a few of us saw a Wedge-rumped briefly and I got better images (Figures 3-7); another of us found a Wedge-rumped days later in his photos, and two others are still looking—the dangers of hundreds, if not thousands of images. Digital is cheaper than film, unless perhaps you figure the cost of your time editing all the images!

about 38 05N, 123 51 W

about 38 05N, 123 51 W

about 38 05N, 123 51 W

Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel on Sunday, at rest and in flight. Look how tiny it is compared to Ashy and Fork-tailed, plus the short legs (relative to Wilson’s), big white wedge, and narrow crooked wings with a longer and more distinct arm than Wilson’s. The bird’s very small size point to it being the smaller taxon kelsalli, not nominate tethys from the Galapagos (likely separate species when somebody bothers to look closely...). Tiny size, along with the big white wedge (showing well even on the water), also rule out Townsend’s Storm-Petrel (see Howell 2012, Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America, for more information).

Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel on Sunday, at rest and in flight. Look how tiny it is compared to Ashy and Fork-tailed, plus the short legs (relative to Wilson’s), big white wedge, and narrow crooked wings with a longer and more distinct arm than Wilson’s. The bird’s very small size point to it being the smaller taxon kelsalli, not nominate tethys from the Galapagos (likely separate species when somebody bothers to look closely…). Tiny size, along with the big white wedge (showing well even on the water), also rule out Townsend’s Storm-Petrel (see Howell 2012, Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America, for more information).

A Wilson’s Storm-Petrel for comparison—no comparison, really, other than having a white rump.

A Wilson’s Storm-Petrel for comparison—no comparison, really, other than having a white rump.

So, there was at least one Wedge-rumped, but there could have been more. It’s fun looking at blizzards of scattering storm-petrels, but it’s also frustrating. Without digital cameras this bird would not have been found at all, let alone refound and better documented the second day. Good luck for anyone who goes looking for it!

For pelagic fans, some photos of other things we saw are included here to round out the post—and hopefully make you want to get on a boat (Figures 8-21). We also saw Blue and Humpback whales, a pod of Baird’s Beaked Whales (one of which spy-hopped, “giving us the beak” before it dived), Guadalupe and Scripps’s murrelets, all 3 jaegers, South Polar Skua, 3 Brown Boobies, the always snappy Buller’s Shearwaters and Sabine’s Gulls, plus Red and Red-necked phalaropes, lots of Black-footed Albatrosses and a personal record high count for this spot of 5 Laysan Albatrosses behind the boat at one time, all juveniles. Back at the breakwater we ran into an amazing slick/swarm guesstimated at 100,000 Sooty Shearwaters, a mind-blowing spectacle! All in all, it didn’t suck being out there.

Spy-hopping Baird’s Beaked Whale—that’s quite a beak!

Spy-hopping Baird’s Beaked Whale—that’s quite a beak!

Obliging Guadalupe Murrelets...

Obliging Guadalupe Murrelets…

And 10 minutes later, Scripps’s Murrelet!

And 10 minutes later, Scripps’s Murrelet!

A small part of the storm-petrel flocks.

A small part of the storm-petrel flocks.

Storm-Petrel.

Storm-Petrel.

Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel.

Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel.

Black Storm-Petrel.

Black Storm-Petrel.

Wilson’s Storm-Petrel.

Wilson’s Storm-Petrel.

Long-beaked Common Dolphins, rarely seen this far north.

Long-beaked Common Dolphins, rarely seen this far north.

“Just another” Brown Booby, a further indicator of warm water.

“Just another” Brown Booby, a further indicator of warm water.

Laysan Albatrosses—usually one per trip is good.

Laysan Albatrosses—usually one per trip is good.

Laysan and Black-footed albatrosses, and not too rough!

Laysan and Black-footed albatrosses, and not too rough!

Part of the Sooty Shearwater swarm—a popular target for recreational fishermen to flush, just what the birds need when they are food-stressed and trying to complete molt before heading back to New Zealand!

Part of the Sooty Shearwater swarm—a popular target for recreational fishermen to flush, just what the birds need when they are food-stressed and trying to complete molt before heading back to New Zealand!

That’s all folks (for now), a Humpback Whale saying goodbye.

That’s all folks (for now), a Humpback Whale saying goodbye.

 –=====–

Steve Howell is a senior field leader with WINGS Birding Tours Worldwide and an occasional guest contributor to the ABA blog. Appropriately, his most recent books, co-authored with Brian Sullivan, are identification guides to Offshore Sea Life for the West Coast (published July 2015) and East Coast (due in November 2015, both from Princeton).

Rare Bird Alert: August 28, 2015

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It’s getting exciting in the ABA Area this week, as passerine migration ramps up to combine with the shorebirds that have been on their way south for a few weeks now. We’re also starting to get our first reports from western Alaska, on the leading edge of what is predicted to be an exceptional El Niño year in the Pacific. There’s a lot to look forward to in the coming months as far as vagrant potential, and for many birders, this one included, this is the best time of the year.

Notable rarities in the ABA Area continuing into this week include the long-staying Collared Plover (ABA Code 5) in south Texas and Tufted Flycatchers (5) in Arizona. Joining them in the continuing column are the White-winged Tern (4) in  Newfoundland and the Washington Lesser Sand-Plover, both seen through mid-week.

From St. Paul Island in the Bering Sea comes the first Code 5 bird of the Alaska fall season, in the form of a Willow Warbler. The first was found last weekend, and subsequently three additional individuals were found on St. Paul later in the week. Also notable for the state, an Anna’s Hummingbird was visiting a feeder in Homer.

Photo by Cory Gregory, Used with permission

Willow Warblers, like this one from St. Paul Island, AK, this week, have become almost annual in the Bering Sea in recent years. Photo by Cory Gregory, Used with permission

Arguably the best birding in the ABA Area in the last seven days came on the overnight pelagic out of Massachusetts. Birders found an incredible assortment of pelagic species, many of which were particularly good for the northeast including Black-capped Petrel, a North American record count of 28 White-faced Storm-Petrels (3), four White-tailed Tropicbirds (3), a Red-billed Tropicbird (3), a South Polar Skua (3) and a Bridled TernThe haul places it firmly among the most-productive Atlantic pelagic trips of all time.

Westerly winds in Nova Scotia, brought a Chestnut-collared Longspur to Victoria.

In Virginia, a Brown Booby (3) was found well inland at Kerr Lake in Mecklenberg.

North Carolina had a Brown Booby (3) as well this week, along with a Masked Booby (3), both offshore out of Hatteras.

South Carolina continues to rack up the Ruff (3) in 2015, with a recent male in Orangeburg, remarkably the state’s 4th for the year.

In Indiana, a Neotropic Cormorant was notable in Tippecanoe.

A Swallow-tailed Kite in Clinton, Michigan, has been delighting birders for several days.

In Iowa, a Townsend’s Warbler was well-photographed in Dickinson.

Saskatchewan also had a Townsend’s Warbler, this one in Saskatoon.

Idaho had a pair of great birds in Owyhee this week, both a Parasitic Jaeger and a Hudsonian Godwit.

A Blue Grosbeak in British Columbia, reported here last week, turned out to be a weird molty Purple Finch, but an actual Blue Grosbeak did turn up not long after in Metchosin.

Washington had a Brown Booby (3) in Snohomish.

In Oregon, a Long-billed Murrelet was seen offshore near Florence.

A pelagic out of Bodega Bay, California, this week turned up one or more Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels (4) on consecutive days.

Noteworthy birds in Arizona include a Slate-throated Redstart (4) and the now annual Sinaloa Wren (5), both in Cochise

And in Texas, a Red Phalarope was found in Dallas.

–=====–

Omissions and errors are not intended, but if you find any please message blog AT aba.org and I will try to fix them as soon as possible. This post is meant to be an account of the most recently reported birds. Continuing birds not mentioned are likely included in previous editions listed here. Place names written in italics refer to counties/parishes.

Readers should note that none of these reports has yet been vetted by a records committee. All birders are urged to submit documentation of rare sightings to the appropriate state or provincial committees. For full analysis of these and other bird observations, subscribe to North American Birds <aba.org/nab>, the richly illustrated journal of ornithological record published by the ABA.

The Other Blackpoll

 

I was a late bloomer. I’d been birding, and birding hard, for nearly three years before I finally laid eyes on a Blackpoll Warbler. And when I did, the floodgates opened. That very first morning, I got ten of them. The next morning, twice that number.

With Blackpoll Warblers, as with so much in [read more…]

Birding Southeast Alaska – Juneau to Whittier

Until Sunday, August 9th I had never birded in Juneau before, nor on the Gulf of Alaska. It’s a whole new Alaskan birding world down there, with many species that do not reach Anchorage or anywhere in Alaska that I have birded so far. From August 9-13 I was part of a very good Wilderness [read more…]

#ABArare – Willow Warbler – Alaska

Rarity season in western Alaska is here at last, and it’s the Pribilofs that throw down the first gauntlet with a Code 5 Willow Warbler on St. Paul. The bird was found in the vicinity of Polovina Hill on 8/22, but has not been seen since.

Photo by Cory Gregory, Used with permission

This [read more…]

Blog Birding #240

Splits and lumps in the birding world are always full of drama. At the Leica Birding Blog, Steve N.G. Howell calls out the AOU for what he sees as an inconsistent approach, and shows a better way forward.

I often hear puzzled birders bemoan AOU decisions, perceiving them as seemingly inconsistent and idiosyncratic: Baltimore and [read more…]

Conservation in Papua New Guinea

A review by Donna Schulman

Searching for Pekpek: Cassowaries and Conservation in the New Guinea Rainforest, by Andrew L. Mack

Cassowary Conservation and Publishing, 2014

235 pages, $19.95—softcover

ABA Sales / Buteo Books 14464

New Guinea looms large in birders’ imaginations. Bowerbirds, dense rain forests, birds of paradise, exotic feather headdresses, the shadow of violence [read more…]

Rare Bird Alert: August 21, 2015

Things are starting to pick up in the last week of August, as one would expect. This week saw a great array of species on both coasts as we head into the most exciting birding months of the year for rarity hunters. ABA Area notables continuing into this week include the Collared Plover (ABA Code [read more…]

More than Color and Intrigue

A review by David Liebmann

The Thing With Feathers: The Surprising Lives of Birds and What They Reveal About Being Human, by Noah Strycker

Riverhead Books, 2014

288 pages, $16.00—softcover

ABA Sales / Buteo Books 14383P

Some books go so far beyond mere information as to force a reappraisal of what readers think they [read more…]

eBird and MLB: A Match Made at Wrigley

 

We’re into the second half of August, which means pennant fever. Well, not here in the Denver metro region (the cellar dweller Rockies are on pace for another 95-loss season), but in many other parts of the ABA Area. Late summer also means an uptick in sightings of herons, egrets, nighthawks…

I think you [read more…]

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