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Happy Thanksgiving from the ABA!

Happy Thanksgiving from the American Birding Association. We hope that American members and friends enjoy their holiday, and that our friends in Canada and elsewhere enjoy their regular Thursday.

The ABA offices are closed for the weekend and The ABA Blog will be taking a short hiatus Thursday and Friday. The regularly scheduled Rare Bird Alert will be published on Saturday as it has been in years past.

 

Enjoy the day!

 

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ABA Releases Much Anticipated Checklist Update

This year’s much anticipated release of the American Birding Association Checklist is here!

In version 8.0 there are 105 species added due last year’s inclusion of Hawaii in the ABA Area–33 of which are ABA  rarity code 6. Also added are 4 vagrants accepted by the Checklist Committee: Common Shelduck, Amethyst-throated Hummingbird, Pine Flycatcher, and Cuban Vireo, as well as one added (Cassia Crossbill) and one subtracted (Thayer’s Gull) based on AOS taxonomic decisions. This results in a total number species on the checklist of 1102.

The ABA would like to thank the volunteer Checklist Committee – Peter Pyle (Chairman), Mary Gustafson, Tom Johnson, Andrew W. Kratter, Aaron Lang, Mark W. Lockwood, Ron Pittaway, and David Sibley – for managing a Herculean job that included revising the ABA Rarity Codes, and adding the 4-letter alpha code for each species.

The checklist can be downloaded in CSV, PDF or XLS at Listing Central by clicking here >>

Hawaii’s inclusion in the ABA Area includes the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

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Blog Birding #345

At 10,000 Birds, Jason Crotty returns making the case to include US territories in the ABA Area.

Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory in the West Indies where it is the easternmost and smallest of the Greater Antilles. Puerto Rico became a territory in 1898 and a commonwealth in 1952. It is now an unincorporated [read more…]

Rare Bird Alert: November 17, 2017

Continuing birds include the return of Tamaulipas Crow (ABA Code 3), still being seen reliably at the Brownsville Dump in Texas, the long-staying Blue-footed Booby in California that researchers on the Farallones have been keeping tabs on, a Thick-billed Vireo (4) in Florida, and a handful of Pink-footed Geese (4) and Barnacle Goose (4) scattered [read more…]

American Birding Podcast: Birding Without Borders with Noah Strycker

Before 2015, a 365 day round the world Big Year had never been attempted. The playing field was intimidating, the perceived cost was daunting, and the logistics were demanding. But in 2015 Birding Associate Editor Noah Strycker tossed all that aside, tackling an ambitious year of birding that took him to all 7 continents [read more…]

The TOP 10: Best National Flags Featuring Birds

Who can deny the power of the bird as a national symbol? Certainly not the nations that make up the ABA Area. The United States has been associated with the Bald Eagle for as long as it has been a nation, and though the Common Loon has only officially been on Canadian currency since 1987, [read more…]

#ABArare – Red-footed Booby – California

On October 29, Josiah Clark found a young booby in Pillar Point Harbor in San Mateo County, California. It was later refound on November 13 where it was identified as an ABA Code 4 Red-footed Booby. While the species is somewhat regular in extreme southern Florida, it is far less common in the Pacific basin. [read more…]

Blog Birding #344

One of the best known hybrids in North America, Brewster’s Warbler has a long history seen even in some individual birds, as Jente Ottenburghs of Avian Hybrids points out.

The remainder of the paper is a year by year description (running from 1922 to 1927) of the adventures of their Brewster’s Warbler in New Jersey. [read more…]

Rare Bird Alert: November 10, 2017

It was an interesting week in the world of ABA Area rare birds, with a handful of false starts on the ABA Rare Bird Alert Facebook group. All understandable though, as November is traditionally an exceptional month for rarities continent-wide. In any case, the confirmed batch of new birds this week is full enough. Noteworthy [read more…]

Nocturnal Flight Calls Online

“Just google it.”

Or: “Just download the app.”

Or, in extreme cases: “Just go to the library.”

Those options work 99% of the time in this birding life, but not—until very recently—in the case of Bill Evans and Michael O’Brien’s indispensable Flight Calls of Migratory Birds. You actually had to buy, borrow, or bootleg the [read more…]

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