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    Rare Bird Alert: March 16, 2012

    It’s been a remarkably slow week for vagrants across much of the continent, for reasons that aren’t entirely clear.  Perhaps it’s just the early spring doldrums, or perhaps it’s the result of the abnormal heat wave that made parts of the upper Midwest and southern Canada feel more like they were experiencing May than March.  Vagrants aside, spring is definitely in the air, with reports from the south of returning Yellow-throated Warblers and Louisiana Waterthrushes, the Eastern Phoebes and Mountain Bluebirds that are such reliable vanguards of the season on either side of the continent are arriving, and the first swallows are finding their way into southern Canada.  There’s plenty to be excited about, even if most of it is exactly what we’re expecting.

    Biggest news of the week wasn’t a bird seen, but a decision handed down by the California Bird Record Committee on a new species for the state.  Back in December a Common Snipe (ABA Code 5) was bagged by a hunter in Riverside, that report – and specimen – was accepted.  The bird itself was mounted and remains the property of the hunter.

    As for living birds, a Slaty-backed Gull (3) was discovered in Del Norte.

    A pelagic trip on the US/Canada border found Mottled Petrels (3) in British Columbia waters and an apparent Black-tailed Gull (4) off of Long Beach, Washington.

    The long staying and well-documented Nutting’s Flycatcher (5) continues in La Paz, Arizona.

    A Eurasian Wigeon was present this week in Michigan City, LaPorte, Indiana.

    In Hart, Geogia, a Pacific Loon was reported on the Georgia side of Lake Hartwell.

    This week in Florida, a Black-throated Gray Warbler was discovered in Miami-Dade.

    –=====–

    Readers should note that none of these reports has yet been vetted by a records committee. All birders are urged to submit documentation of rare sightings to the appropriate state or provincial committees. For full analysis of these and other bird observations, subscribe to North American Birds <aba.org/nab>, the richly illustrated journal of ornithological record published by the ABA.

     

     

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    Nate Swick

    Nate Swick

    Nate Swick is the editor of the American Birding Association Blog. A long-time member of the bird blogosphere, Nate has been writing about birds and birding at The Drinking Bird since 2007, but can also be found writing regularly at 10,000 Birds. In the non-digital world, he's an environmental educator and interpretive naturalist. Nate lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Danielle, and two young children, who are not yet aware that they are being groomed to be birders.
    • Chris W

      The Eurasian Wigeon was a one day wonder that was present less than 4 hours.

      Also, a Smew was seen on Fri-Sun at Long Point in Ontario. It hasn’t been seen since then though.

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