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August 2012 “Winging It” online now!

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Screen shot 2012-08-21 at 11.36.27 PMIn the past, I have started these posts with something like, “By now, you should have received your copy of Winging It in the mail…” Well, no longer. The August issue was put to bed a week ago, and we have the technology to show it to you right now. Why wait? And besides, we on the ABA’s publications team want more of you to start utilizing our online resources. Here, you’ll find an incresingly large amount of content that’s unavailable in our printed media.

The August issue’s lead article, by Jennifer Rycenga, is about how birdfinding guides have evolved so far in the 21st century. Specifically, it’s about the birdfinding guide she manages…online. Anyone hoping to produce a local guide in the future–and have it remain relevant–would be well advised to closely consider Jennifer’s sage suggestions.

A new column, “Fowl Language”, attempts to untangle potentially confusing birder and scientific jargon. Guest author Stacia Novy spells out the differences between reintroduction and repatriation, census and survey, and venomous and poisonous. This piece is well worth your time. I’ve had to alter how I speak in one instance: I’ll never think of “reintroduction” the same way again.

160px-Aplomado_Falcon_portrait

Tom Schulenberg informs us of some of the 2012 changes to the Clements Checklist. (Can you say Haemorhous?) Brad Andres tells us about how Birders’ Exchange is helping with chorlito studies in Chile and Argentina, and Bill Stewart announces the ABA’s Mid-Atlantic Young Birder Conference (22 Sep. 2012 in Delaware).

And our regular Winging It contributors continue to provide the high-quality content you’ve come to expect: Paul Hess’s “News and Notes”, Eric Salzman’s “Books for Birders”, Bill Schmoker’s “Geared for Birding”, and last but not least, Amy Davis’s “Sightings”. Even if you’re not into rarities, David Seibel’s photo of a gorgeous Red-necked Stint makes it worth flipping though Amy’s dutifully-researched column. But you can only fully appreciate it when viewed in color, which can’t be done with the black-and-white printed copy headed to your mailbox. So check out Winging It–online and in color–now! It’s as simple as clicking here.

I used to think that Aplomado Falcons had been reintroduced in coastal Texas. It appears I may have been wrong.

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Michael Retter
Michael L. P. Retter is the editor of the ABA's newest magazine, Birder's Guide. He also wears his ABA cap while working as a Technical Reviewer for Birding magazine. When not at home, Michael is often leading tours in Middle America (Mexico through Panama). He currently lives with his fiancé, Matt, in Fort Worth, Texas. In his fleeting free time there, he pursues interests in horticulture (especially orchids), music, cooking, and numismatics. Michael also runs GBNA, the continent's informal club and email list for LGBT birders.
  • http://aba.org/bex Betty Petersen

    This is terrific, Michael. Love the increased content, love the color, and I can even read the online print without my glasses, another bonus!

  • http://www.xenospiza.com Michael Retter

    Thanks, Betty!

  • Jennifer Rycenga

    Looking forward to receiving lots of visitors to our San Mateo County Birding Guide site – with criticisms, suggestions, and compliments! Thanks for the opportunity to share the project, Michael and the ABA!

  • http://profile.typepad.com/chaetura Chas Swift

    It’s probably worth mentioning this is only available to ABA members along with the best way to get one’s membership number (I don’t seem to have any ABA publications handy which presumably shows this). Can I email someone at ABA to get this? Looking forward to seeing it when I get access!

  • http://www.xenospiza.com Michael Retter

    Hi, Chas. Your membership number is printed along with your address on anything you receive in the mail from ABA. If you can’t find it, you can always call our office at (800) 850-2473 or (719) 578-9703. Someone (likely Liz, Nancy, or LeAnn) will be happy to help you.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/chaetura Chas Swift

    Thanks Michael, I figured that but usually toss packaging from Birding & ABA which has that information (& can’t find any other ABA pubs w/ mailing label). Guess I will call or email. Might be worth mentioning this somewhere on the new user registration web page (this was probably mentioned somewhere recently but I guess I missed it). Thanks!

  • http://www.xenospiza.com Michael Retter

    You’re welcome, Chas. “Winging It” has your membership number stamped on newsletter itself at the bottom of the first page, so it can’t be removed as there’s no packaging to throw away. I have already passed along your suggestion to our web gurus.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/birding David Hartley

    Hi, Chas. All you need to access the files is an online account. You can set that up by going to this page https://www2.aba.org/ and clicking on the “New User Registration” link. Fill out that form and once we confirm your membership is active, you will have access to all of the “members only” online material. Your membership ID is not needed to create an account (it’s optional). Thanks for the comment!

  • http://www.xenospiza.com Michael Retter

    Thanks for clarifying, David!

  • http://profile.typepad.com/chaetura Chas Swift

    Great – thanks all for the information. Would be worth mentioning this on the web form (so many of us are used to registering for a web site and getting instant access).

  • maviyan

    A very fine article and exceptional blog. Is there any way I can subscribe to new articles, you know like acquiring them on email or something like that.
    http://www.surveytool.com/online-surveys/

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