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    Birding News Update: Mobile Edition

    Over the past 4 weeks, we’ve received (and responded to!) hundreds-upon-hundreds of emails from users of ABA Birding News. Some were kudos, some were gripes, and some were suggestions.

    In the suggestions column, one request outnumbered all others: “what about a mobile version?”

    Well, how’s this?

    Birding_mobile

    As of this afternoon, if you go to birding.aba.org on a smart-phone, you’ll automagically (thanks, Jack) get things formatted for your device. In addition to fitting your screen, the site is stripped down in digest-format, and displays the 50 most recent messages from each list … so load-time is quick. Additionally, active links within the messages have been shortened, so that really long ones like Google Maps, don’t mess with the formatting.

    We hope you enjoy this new format, and as always, we want to hear from you!

     

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    Greg Neise

    Greg Neise

    Greg Neise developed his interests in birds, photography and conservation as a youngster growing up in Chicago, across the street from Lincoln Park Zoo. At the age of 13, he worked alongside Dr. William S. Beecher, then Director of the Chicago Academy of Sciences and a pioneering ornithologist, and learned to photograph wildlife, an interest that developed into a career supplying images for magazines, newspapers, institutions and books, including National Geographic (print, web and television), Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Boston Globe, Nature, Lincoln Park Zoo, Miami Zoo, Jacksonville Zoo, The Field Museum and a host of others. He has served as President of the Rainforest Conservation Fund, a volunteer organization dedicated to preserving the world's tropical rainforests. Greg is a web developer for the ABA, and of course, a fanatical birder.
    Greg Neise

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    • Aaron Boone

      I’m using my iPod Touch to view the new mobile site. In some of the messages, the body of the message has lines that don’t flow normally (e.g., a full line of text followed by the next line with only 3 or 4 words…followed by a normal full line of text…). I sometimes receive emails from people that have this similar pattern so maybe it’s an emailing thing?

      Also, I’d recommend a different font for the actual body of the message. When viewed in portrait mode and zoomed out to take in the full message, the text seems very faint. The header and subject font are great at this level.

      Looks great guys!

    • http://www.softechebs.com/mobile-phone-development/ios-applications/ iPhone Developers

      I’m using my iPod Touch to view the new mobile site. In some of the messages, the body of the message has lines that don’t flow normally.

    Birders know well that the healthiest, most dynamic choruses contain many different voices. The birding community encompasses a wide variety of interests, talents, and convictions. All are welcome.
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