Nikon Monarch 7

aba events

ABA Blog in Review: October 2012

Thanks to all our readers for making this month the best, as far as traffic is concerned, in the history of the ABA Blog.  This was an exciting month for the organization as a whole too, as our first ABA Birding Rally was held at Kiptopeke State Park in Virginia to great success.  We'd love to see you at an upcoming ABA Event, so check out our calendar and see what looks exciting.

But here's a quick rundown of the fun stuff we had here at the ABA Blog this month.

George Armistead offers his choices for the Top 10 Cutest Birds in North America.  I have to say, the exclusion of Sanderling from the list was a travesty in this blogger's humble opinion. 

Lynn Barber takes a break from her South Dakota Big Year, but not from thinking about how important carrying a camera has become, for better or for worse, for documenting rarities.

Ted Eubanks returns with a resonant look at conservation concerns on the Caribbean island of Grenada

Ted Floyd's integration of Birding magazine and the ABA Blog continues, with posts on Chandler Robbins, hybrid hummingbirds, photo quizzes, and some exciting member's only book reviews

Blake Mathys shared a compelling post about certainty in bird identification, and what it means to be an "expert".

If you haven't yet seen Bird of the Year coordinator Robert Mortenson's recruitment video for the BOY multimedia art contest, you absolutely need to. 

Greg Neise offers some helpful hints on how to make your birding listserv experience a more rewarding one for everyone reading your posts. 

Winging It editor Michael Retter digs into some of the new scientific names we find in the most recent AOU Check-list suipplement. 

Photo guru Bill Schmoker shares some secrets of dealing with issues that effect photo quality, from high ISO to fixing foggy photos

Noah Strycker gets some birding in via webcam from California's Farallon Islands.

Rick Wright reviews the Kaufman's new Field Guide to the Nature of New England

A great lineup of Open Mics highlighted the month, with submissions from Rob Fergus on bionic birding, Susan Ford-Hoffert takes us on a field trip through the Woodson Art Museum, Ruth Bloedorn shares some tips for attracting birds, and Steve N.G. Howell in a two part post discusses what works and what doesn't in writing a field guide.

October was a hot month for rare birds, not only the Hurricane…er… Superstorm Sandy washed tons of new birds up on northeastern shores, but excellent birds were found everywhere.  Alaska and British Columbia hosted a bunch of Asian passerines, with an additional Siberian Blue Robin and a Pine Bunting, a state first Gray-tailed Tattler in Massachusetts, Rhode Island's first Wood Sandpiper, Oregon's first Cassin's Sparrow, and Georgia's first Dusky Flycatcher.

–=====–

Thanks for your continued support and patronage.  If you haven't already, pleas consider joining the ABA

We'll see you next month!

Facebooktwitter
The following two tabs change content below.
Nate Swick

Nate Swick

Editor, Social Media Manager at American Birding Association
Nate Swick is the editor of the American Birding Association Blog, social media manager for the ABA, and the host of the American Birding Podcast. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Danielle, and two young children. He is the author of Birding for the Curious and The ABA Field Guide to Birds of the Carolinas.
  • Indeed, Nate I have taken some heat for omitting Sanderling. Especially after spending most of Hurricane Sandy with a Sanderling roosting at my feet (came in right off the river and landed next to our group; nicknamed it “Sandy” of course) I must acknowledge the oversight. Sanderling for president!

For decades, we have worked hard to mentor and encourage birding’s next generation.

Please help us build a brighter future for birds and for birding. Click here to donate now.

We have raised 31.69% of our $30,000.00 goal:

31.69%


American Birding Podcast

Birders know well that the healthiest, most dynamic choruses contain many different voices. The birding community encompasses a wide variety of interests, talents, and convictions. All are welcome.
If you like birding, we want to hear from you.
Read More »

Recent Comments

Categories

Authors

Archives

ABA's FREE Birder's Guide

If you live nearby, or are travelling in the area, come visit the ABA Headquarters in Delaware City.

Beginning this spring we will be having bird walks, heron watches and evening cruises, right from our front porch! Click here to view the full calender, and register for events >>

via email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Open Mice: Kestrels–An Iowa Legacy May 16, 2017 6:29
    A few years ago, a short drive down my gravel road would yield at least one, if not two, American Kestrels perched on a power line or hovering mid-air above the grassy ditch. Today, I have begun to count myself lucky to drive past a mere one kestrel per week rather than the daily sightings. […]
  • It’s the Maine Young Birders Club! May 13, 2017 4:03
    York County Audubon is helping to launch the Maine Young Birders Club (MYBC)—the first of its kind in the state! […]
  • Announcing the 2017 ABA Young Birders of the Year! February 28, 2017 10:48
    The judges have reviewed all of the outstanding entries. ABA staff has compiled the scores. After much anticipation, we are thrilled to announce the winners of the 2017 ABA Young Birder of the Year Contest! Your 2017 ABA Young Birder of the Year in the 14-18 age group is 18-year-old Johanna Beam from Lyons, Colorado. […]

Follow ABA on Twitter