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    #ABArare - Calliope Hummingbird - Delaware

    Another day, another first state record hummingbird for Delaware.  In a fashion remarkably similar to the story of yesterday’s Anna’s Hummingbird, a bird visiting a feeder in Wilmington since November 5 and originally identified only to genus was confirmed recently to be the state’s first Calliope Hummingbird.

    Unfortunately, the bird has not been seen since November 11. Andy Urquart recently posted the following on the Delaware listserv:

    Although the homeowner reports that the Calliope Hummingbird was seen this morning, it was not seen during a 4-hour vigil this afternoon, despite repeated feeder visits by a Rufous Hummingbird also present on the property. A significant difficulty is that the backyard where the bird has been seen is not visible or accessible from the street. The only viewing is from inside the house. The homeowner is willing to try to arrange access for birders, but first we need to determine if the bird is still around. If it is, some directions will be issued for birders to try to get to see the bird.

    Calliope Hummingbird is another common western hummingbird reported with increasing frequency at feeders in the east in fall.  Recent reports in the east include one from nearby Chester, Pennsylvania, from earlier this week.  Delaware is one of the last states in the east to add the species to its official list.

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    Nate Swick

    Nate Swick

    Nate Swick is the editor of the American Birding Association Blog. A long-time member of the bird blogosphere, Nate has been writing about birds and birding at The Drinking Bird since 2007, but can also be found writing regularly at 10,000 Birds. In the non-digital world, he's an environmental educator and interpretive naturalist. Nate lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Danielle, and two young children, who are not yet aware that they are being groomed to be birders.
    Birders know well that the healthiest, most dynamic choruses contain many different voices. The birding community encompasses a wide variety of interests, talents, and convictions. All are welcome.
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