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Blog Birding #108

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If you’re not following BirdCast, Cornell Lab of O’s new project which takes eBird data, combines it with weather forecasts, and comes out with a product that seeks to predict the movement of migrants and vagrants across the continent, you should be. The most recent post weighs in on at that big cold front that’s currently making its way eastward:

The Weather Channel has taken to naming winter storms for the 2012-2013 winter season, and Brutus is at bat. This powerfulstorm is dumping heavy snow in parts of the Rockies, and the associated frontal boundary strongly demarcates much  colder from very warm air. As the low tracks east, strong southerly and southwesterly flow prevails across much of the Plains through the Mississippi River valley north to the Great Lakes. These conditions are likely to produce a significant western flavor to late season bird migration, including the appearance of more Cave Swallows in the Great Lakes by the weekend.

Mark Catesby is one of the most influential of the 18th Century naturalist/artists cataloging the New World.  Rick Wright, at Birding New Jersey and the World, takes a look at some lexicographical inconsistencies in the translation of Catesby’s work to French:

By the mid-seventeenth century, French had made great progress towards displacing its elder brother, Latin, as the language of  learning in western Europe. More important than that, even, and an obvious point not brought up in the discussion, the savants of Paris and Blois were a huge audience for books in natural history. Printing Catesby’s text in both languages, English and French in parallel columns on the page, both lent the book an air of scientific authority and opened the continental markets in ways that a monolingual text might not have.

Tis the season for flyover flocks of blackbirds.  David Sibley shares his technique for looking for Rusties among Red-wings and Grackles:

First, listen for a slightly different call. All of the blackbirds and grackles give a low harsh check or tuk call in flight. In Red-winged Blackbird this is a relatively simple and unmusical chek, like hitting two twigs together. Rusty Blackbird’s call is more like chook,
it has more complexity and depth. Rusty’s call is slightly longer, slightly descending, and with a bit of musical tone. It reminds me vaguely of the harsh chig call of Red-bellied Woodpecker.

The venerable birding blog carnival I and the Bird returns at 10,000 BirdsThis month’s theme?  Nuthatches.

Few groups of birds are as endearing as the noble nuthatch.  The family Sittidae offers birders across the Northern Hemisphere no  shortage of opportunities for merriment as they clamor through trees and feeding stations, almost always oriented on the vertical plane and offering vocalizations variously described as yanks, toots, and the squealing of arboreal rubber ducks.

Laura Erickson shares a tale of her capture by Caprimulgids, her first nighthawk:

That evening, Russ had to do some work in his lab at the Natural Resources Building at Michigan State University. I often tagged along to keep him company when he worked at night, but when we got to the parking lot and I saw the nighthawks, I was rooted to the spot. He went in and I parked myself right there, sitting on one of those parking space cement thingies for an hour or two,  utterly mesmerized. The gracefully erratic flight was made even more beautiful because the white patches near the wingtips looked like crescent moons.

 

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Nate Swick

Nate Swick

Nate Swick is the editor of the American Birding Association Blog. A long-time member of the bird blogosphere, Nate has been writing about birds and birding at The Drinking Bird since 2007, but can also be found writing regularly at 10,000 Birds. In the non-digital world, he's an environmental educator and interpretive naturalist. Nate lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Danielle, and two young children, who are not yet aware that they are being groomed to be birders.
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  • Steve Arena, in The ABA Needs Your NWR Birding Photos!... { Female Least Bittern wing flicking while hunting; https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/19421400216/in/photostream/ Photographed 05 July 2015, GMNWR, Concord Impoundments, Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Male Least Bittern in flight https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/18801591562/in/album-72157629831020551/... }
  • Amy K, in Rare Bird Alert: July 24, 2015... { Just one BBWD in Indiana, not a pair }
  • Nathan Hentze, in The How and Why of Urban Cooper's Hawks... { A different look at urban Cooper's Hawks, this time in Vancouver BC and focusing on toxicology, found what is being touted as the most polluted... }
  • Rick Wright, in The How and Why of Urban Cooper's Hawks... { I'll be interested to see how the results complement and compare with this 12-year study conducted in urban Tucson: http://ag.arizona.edu/~steidl/files/pdfs/Mannan%20et%20al.%202008%20Urban%20Ecosystems.pdf }
  • Lynn, in Considering Killdeers and Collared Doves... { Just now - a Rufous Hummingbird at my flowers on my Anchorage porch! A non-rare rarity, I guess. }
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