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#ABArare – Little Egret – Massachusetts

A Little Egret (Code 4) was found at the marsh next to Kalmus Beach, Hyannis (Barnstable), MA on Nov 21, though due to the identification challenge, it wasn’t reported as that species until about Nov 30. In a post to Massbird, Marshall Iliff points out that John Kricher was the first to report the bird on Nov 21 through eBird. Kricher wrote that he considered Little Egret but ultimately decided to report it as a Snowy Egret, though he seemed to not be comfortable with that identification.

A few others then also reported it as a Snowy until Myer Bornstein on Nov 29 asked on Massbird if it could be a Little Jeremiah Trimble, David Sibley, Marshall Iliff, and Richard Heil all agreed that it was an “interesting” bird, though none completely eliminated the possibility of it being a hybrid or an odd-looking individual of another species. (Since then, I have not seen public discussion of the identification, but eBird reports are being listed as “confirmed”.)

ABArare Little Egret Bornstein 1

ABArare Little Egret Bornstein 2
photos by Myer Bornstein – Photo Bee 1

The marsh at Kalmus Beach is located west of the southern end of Ocean STREET (you’ll see why I’m emphasis that in a moment). The location is marked on this map as “Kalmus Beach Marsh”. This is where most sightings have occurred, but the egret is not always present at this location. It’s also been seen at the pond on the north side of Ocean AVENUE (marked as “Pond at Ocean Ave” on the map), which is about one mile west of the marsh at Kalmus Beach. Furthermore, a Snowy Egret was reported from Hallets Millpond (also marked on the map), about five miles north-northeast of Kalmus Beach on Nov 30, but upon review, it appears that it was the Little Egret. It has not been seen there since.

The egret has been seen every day since Nov 27 except Nov 30 (and also that day if you count the Hallets Millpond sighting). Check Massbird for updates.

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John Puschock

John Puschock

John Puschock reports ABA rare bird alerts and manages #ABArare for the American Birding Association. John is a frequent participant in rare bird forums around the web and has knack for gathering details necessary to relocate birds. He has been a birder since 1984 and now leads tours for Bird Treks, as well as for his own company Zugunruhe Birding Tours. He has led tours to locations across North America, from Newfoundland to New Mexico and from Costa Rica to Alaska. He specializes in leading tours to Adak in the Aleutian Islands.
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