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Photo Quiz, Jan./Feb. 2013 Birding, Part 3 of 3

One more!

In Part 1 of the January/February 2013 Birding photo quiz, we wrestled with—we’re still wrestling with—12 ducks. In Part 2, we were faced with a titmouse that folks seem to agree is a hybrid Black-crested x Tufted Titmouse (but are there any dissenting views? if so, bring ’em on!).

Here now is the third and final quiz photo:

13-1-16-03 [Quiz Photo C]

Like the first two, this photo is from Texas, specifically from Brownsville, Cameron County. The date is late February.

What do you think it is? As usual, it would be educational for all of us if you could tell us why. Thanks!

 

 

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  • James Swanson

    Looks like a Krider’s to me. Ferruginous would have whiter remiges. And look at those patagial bars!

  • Brian Monk

    I agree. Patagial bars = Red-tail. Pale Red Tail in S. Tx = Krider’s. But I haven’t seen many, so how old is it??

  • James Swanson

    Probably a juvenile. An adult Krider’s would tend to show some red, especially towards tip of tail. I don’t know how definitive this characteristic is.

  • Clay Taylor

    Uh, unh – that is the South Texas into Mexico sub-species Buteo jamaicensis fuertesi – the Fuertes’ Red-tail. They are very pale, and have almost no belly band.

  • Jo Dee Townsend

    I think it’s a immature Red Tail Hawk…..but I’m a 70 yr immature birder so my answer is based only on books I have to compare pictures and descriptions
    with. What is a Krider? I have nothing in my books referring to a Krider!

  • Mmm Patagial bars, may be Red tailed hawk…

  • Briana c

    A “Krider” is a member of a subspecies of the Red-Tailed Hawk Buteo jamaicensis kriderii. They tend to be much lighter in color than typical Red-Taileds and often lack the red tail and even in some cases lack a terminal band. You’re most likely right in that it’s an immature Red-Tailed since adult Krider’s do usually have some pinkish on the tail and don’t usually have that strong of banding.

  • Jo Dee Townsend

    Thanks for the information.

  • James Swanson

    Wouldn’t a Fuertes’ Red-tail have a darker head? Krider’s is known for its light-colored head. Also, I understand that the window in the primaries is a Krider’s trait.

  • Amy Darling

    Looks like a juvenile Krider’s Red-tail based on the windows of light on the secondaries, the patagial bars, and faint trailing edge to the wings. Probably juvenile due to bands on the tail and faintness of the trailing edge. Looks like the middle tail feather has molted not too long ago…

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