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    Open Mic: 2013 Birding Cup coming to Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center

    At the Mic: Jennifer Pencek

    Jennifer Pencek is a freelance writer based in State College, Pennsylvania, and associate editor of the Center for the Performing Arts at Penn State. She loves being able to mix her love of writing with the outdoors.

    –====–

    Birding enthusiasts and those new to the ever-growing pastime are getting ready for the 2013 Birding Cup at Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center in Petersburg, Pennsylvania, the center’s annual fundraising tournament. Will you be one of them?

    The Birding Cup, this year held from 7 p.m. Friday, May 3, to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 4, is a contest among teams of birders to identify the most bird species in a twenty-four hour period in the central Pennsylvania region (Huntingdon, Centre, and adjoining counties). Teams must compete based on a set of Birding Cup rules, and the winning teams are awarded prizes immediately following the contest at the center.

    Red-Rumped-Reducks

    For some insight into the world of Birding Cup, listen to this 2007 story reported by Cynthia Berger of WPSU.

    Birding Cup selects winning teams in four categories:

    The Birding Cup goes to the team that identifies the most species overall;

    The County Cup goes to the team that finds the most species while searching in only one county;

    The Potter Mug is for the best team with at least half of its members who have less than two years of birding experience; and

    The Birding Boot goes to the team that identifies the most species traveling only by non-motorized means (walking, biking, canoeing, etc.).

    Shaver’s Creek fundraising goal for this year’s Birding Cup is $12,000. Pledges may be made per bird identified or in a single donation, and donors may choose to support a specific team. For more information, visit the website or call 814-863-2000 or 814-667-3424

    Birding Cup teams must consist of at least three members and must follow the rules of Birding Cup when participating. Team entries should be submitted no later than four days prior to the start. Team entry is free but teams are encouraged to raise at least $100 in donations to Birding Cup. Contact Shaver’s Creek to enter your team. Download the official Birding Cup checklist online to track bird species you see during the Birding Cup. This completed checklist must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. on Saturday at the center.

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    The ABA Blog's Open Mics offer an opportunity for members of the birding community to share their voice with the ABA audience. We accept all and any submissions. If you have something you'd like to share, please contact blog editor Nate Swick at blog@aba.org
    Birders know well that the healthiest, most dynamic choruses contain many different voices. The birding community encompasses a wide variety of interests, talents, and convictions. All are welcome.
    If you like birding, we want to hear from you.
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