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    Your turn: Warming Up to Winter Birding

    Do you have trouble keeping warm while birding this time of year? If so, make sure you check out Erik’s Bruhnke’s article, “Warming Up to Winter Birding”, in the current issue of Birder’s Guide to Gear. Erik grew up in Wisconsin and lives in Duluth, so he knows what he’s talking about! To read the article, just click here. The entire issue is available online.

    Or maybe you’re an old pro when it comes to keeping toasty warm in the dead of winter. Please share your tips with the rest of us in the comment section below. Likewise, if you have questions for Erik, please share them.

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    Michael Retter
    Michael L. P. Retter is the editor of the ABA's newest magazine, Birder's Guide. He also wears his ABA cap while working as a Technical Reviewer for Birding magazine. When not at home, Michael is often leading tours in Middle America (Mexico through Panama). He currently lives with his fiancé, Matt, in Fort Worth, Texas. In his fleeting free time there, he pursues interests in horticulture (especially orchids), music, cooking, and numismatics. Michael also runs GBNA, the continent's informal club and email list for LGBT birders.
    Michael Retter

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    • Nancy DeWitt

      Living in Fairbanks where our winter temperatures often drop to -40, we’ve learned a few things about staying warm while playing outdoors. One thing I would add to your article is the usefulness of chemical hand and toe warmers–not just for their intended purpose, but for keeping camera batteries from getting sluggish. A toe warmer can actually be stuck right onto the outside of the camera’s battery compartment.

      • Michael Retter

        That’s a wonderful suggestion, Nancy. Thanks for sharing!

    • Ed Clark

      The model is obviously not dresses for Winter birding with cotton jeans and leather (or cotton?) Gloves! Her boots are difficult to see but if they are the standard hiking type then they would be inadequate for standing around for very long, which is common when looking for birds during cold temperatures. Hopefully when the guide comes out it will cover the topic of staying warm a little better than the image does.
      Sincerely,
      Ed Clark
      Alaska Rare Bird Listserv
      Alaska 200 Club

      • Michael Retter

        Thanks for sharing your comments, Ed. Winter means different things to different people. If it’s 28F (which is an exceptionally cold winter day in many parts of the ABA Area), then the woman in the photo is dressed quite suitably for the weather. You and I don’t know what the conditions were that day, so it’s presumptuous for us to say she’s not dressed properly. As for the guide “coming out”, members started receiving it in early December, and it’s been available online since US Thanksgiving. If you are a member and have not yet received your hard copy, please call the ABA Office at (800) 850-2473–and ask for LeAnn, Liz, or Nancy–so that we can figure out what’s going on.

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