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The 2014 Farm Bill and Wildlife

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There are few pieces of legislation that pass through congress that have such an outsized influence on conservation policy than the annual Farm Bill, and the omnibus package that was finally sent to the President early this month is no different. The bill establishes funding for a wide range of programs for the next five years, but noteworthy among them for birders are those that encourage farmers to protect wetlands on private property by requiring conservation compliance as a precondition for qualification for various federal insurance subsidies.

In short, if farmers want to qualify for federal programs, they need to protect the wetlands on their property. The benefit to grassland nesting species is obvious.

Prairie nesting waterfowl like these Blue-winged Teal stand to benefit from increased protection of private wetlands

Prairie nesting waterfowl like these Blue-winged Teal stand to benefit from increased protection of private wetlands

The Farm Bill also included provisions for the Sodsaver program, a wholly new initiative that limits subsidies for farming on previously unplowed grassland. Sodsaver is currently limited to 6 states (ND, SD, IA, MN, MT, and NE), but those states cover a great deal of habitat and host a number of breeding waterfowl and shorebirds, not to mention myriad other waterbirds, in the northern Great Plains. Perhaps in time, this provision can be expanded to apply to the entire region.

In addition, the bill retains a number of critical conservation incentive programs that encourage landowners to protect land that is marginal for farming by planting native grasses, conducting controlled burns, or providing cover on erodible landscapes, among other things. The programs also allow farmers and landowners to get technical assistance in making their land more friendly for wildlife.

It’s far from perfect, but it’s far better than maybe any of us had a right to expect, too. At points in the last few years it looked as if many of most successful conservation initiatives in past Farm Bills would be stripped, so it’s something of a pleasant surprise that so many of them were retained, and even strengthened. It’s a little bit of positive news in a process that seems to too often elicit frustration.

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Nate Swick

Nate Swick

Nate Swick is the editor of the American Birding Association Blog. A long-time member of the bird blogosphere, Nate has been writing about birds and birding at The Drinking Bird since 2007, but can also be found writing regularly at 10,000 Birds. In the non-digital world, he's an environmental educator and interpretive naturalist. Nate lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Danielle, and two young children, who are not yet aware that they are being groomed to be birders.
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  • Ross Silcock

    Nate- nice article. One thing- the farm bill is a 5-year bill, not annual, which is even better for wildlife.
    Ross Silcock

    • http://blog.aba.org/ Nate Swick

      Thanks Ross. I’ll make that more clear when I get back to a computer.

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