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    Your turn: Pelagic Prep

    When Diana Doyle speaks about preparing for a pelagic trip, you should listen: Diana lives on a boat!

    The March 2014 issue of Birder’s Guide to Travel features Diana’s latest article, “Pelagic Prep: Getting Ready to Bird at Sea”. From how to prepare to what to do (and, perhaps more importantly, what not to do) on board, you can read Diana’s advice online (and for free!) by following this link. Once the e-magazine has downloaded, just turn to page 70. You can download the entire issue, or just Diana’s article, by clicking on the fourth button from the right in the toolbar above the magazine’s pages.

    Do any of Diana’s suggestions work especially well for you? Is there something you’ve personally found helpful which she didn’t mention? Do you have a general comment about her article? Please, share your own tips and comments with other ABA members here, in the comment section below this post.

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    Michael Retter
    Michael L. P. Retter is the editor of the ABA's newest magazine, Birder's Guide. He also wears his ABA cap while working as a Technical Reviewer for Birding magazine. When not at home, Michael is often leading tours in Middle America (Mexico through Panama). He currently lives with his partner, Matt, in West Lafayette, Indiana. In his fleeting free time there, he pursues interests in horticulture (especially orchids), music, cooking, and numismatics. Michael also runs GBNA, the continent's informal club and email listserv for LGBT birders.
    Michael Retter

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    • Quentin Brown

      Thanks for a great article. Diana’s suggestion of Dramamine works best for me. I am prone to motion sickness, I remember throwing up as two lifer northern gannets flew by on a short boat ride from Portland, Maine. However, taking Dramamine the night before, and morning of, I’ve been able to enjoy Pelagics from Westport, WA and Ucluelet, BC to the point of being able to eat a midday lunch on board!

    • Diana Doyle

      One of our readers, Judith D., a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist in Fairbanks, Alaska, pointed out that, according to the packaging, a Trans-Derm Scop patch should not be cut. She is correct. However, in practice many physicians are recommending cutting the patch. (Doctors are allowed to prescribe outside the approved indications.). I spoke with an MD and pharmacist (both offshore sailors) and apparently the active ingredient is in the adhesive layer, not sandwiched between layers, so in this case it will not “run out” if the patch is cut. HOWEVER, everyone should speak with their own doctor, get his or her personal recommendation and advice, and in all instances be sure to wash your hands immediately after handling a patch! Thanks Judith for pointing that out.

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