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ABA Checklist Committee adds Red-legged Honeycreeper to the ABA Checklist

Members of the ABA Checklist Committee (CLC) recently added Red-legged Honeycreeper to the ABA Checklist based on a juvenile photographed at Estero Llano Grande State Park, Texas, 27–29 November 2014. Seven members voted that the honeycreeper presumably represented a presumed natural vagrant from Mexico, while the dissenting member was concerned that the bird may have been an escaped captive.

Red-legged Honeycreeper in South Texas is a potential ABA Area first, pending decisions by the Texas BRC and the ABA Checklist Committee

This young Red-legged Honeycreeper, discovered in Hidalgo Co, Texas, in 2014, is the most recent addition to the ABA Checklist. Photo: Dorian Anderson

A full account of the honeycreeper vote and other decisions of the CLC since October 2015 will be featured in our next annual report, to be published in the November 2016 issue of Birding.

The number of species on the ABA Checklist is increased to 991.

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Bill Pranty

Bill Pranty

Bill Pranty has lived and birded in central Florida for more than 35 years. Pranty’s studies emphasize the documentation of Florida’s diverse avifauna, with a focus on its exotic species. His research has added four species to the ABA Checklist—Egyptian Goose, Purple Swamphen, Nanday Parakeet, and Common Myna—all of them exotics from Florida. Pranty is chairman of the ABA Checklist Committee, and a technical reviewer for and frequent contributor to Birding magazine. He has written dozens of peer-reviewed ornithological papers and is the author or co-author of six books, among these a Birder's Guide to Florida, the ABA Checklist, and the ABA Field Guide to Birds of Florida.
  • David Frazelle

    Any decision on the possible addition of the California Scrub Jay?

    • That’s the AOU’s baby. We expect the publication of their decisions within the month.
      Sent from my phone

    • Michael Retter

      Like Nate said, the ABA doesn’t split species. The AOU does. However, the ABA does translate the AOU’s technical writing into a more birder-friendly version. You will find the news on any new splits and lumps here on the ABA blog immediately when the news drops, so be sure to check back regularly!

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