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Photo Quiz: August 2016 Birding

Photo by © Tara Tanaka.

Photo by © Tara Tanaka.

This photo, by itself, isn’t all that hard. We’ll even tell you what it is: It’s an Eastern Phoebe. But there’s a hitch. Of course. The quiz question isn’t: What’s this bird? Instead: What bird is the Eastern Phoebe frequently mistaken for, especially in winter?

Tony Leukering, bird ID expert and general ponderer of how birders think, invites us in the August 2016 Birding to consider “The Most Underused ID Feature” of all: time of year. If you know when flycatchers show up in the ABA Area, you would never, ever, confuse a winter Eastern Phoebe with, well, anything. That’s because, in many places where phoebes winter, like North Carolina, they’re the only birds that look like phoebes. Phoebe lookalikes–Eastern Wood-Pewee, Eastern Kingbird, Traill’s Flycatcher, etc.–simply aren’t around in winter.

But not everybody knows that. And that’s Leukering point. The phoebe situation is fairly straightforward. But other cases are not. In his commentary in the August issue, Leukering reviews for us various “confusing” IDs that really aren’t confusing at all–if you just look at a calendar. These include winter Chipping Sparrows (try American Tree Sparrow), early Orange-crowned Warblers (also known as Tennessee Warbler), and late juvenile Short-billed Dowitchers (probably Long-billed). And others.

For ABA BlogNeedless to say, Leukering’s commendably short and readable commentary doesn’t touch on every instance in which time of year is valuable to the ID process. So here’s our question: What are examples from your own neck of the woods where simply paying attention to the calendar can clear up what might otherwise be a gnarly ID problem?

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Ted Floyd

Ted Floyd

Editor, Birding magazine at American Birding Association
Ted Floyd is the Editor of Birding magazine, and he is broadly involved in other programs and initiatives of the ABA. He is the author of more than 100 magazine and journal articles, and has written four recent books, including an ABA title, the ABA Guide to Birds of Colorado. Floyd is a frequent speaker at birding festivals and state ornithological society meetings, and he has served on the boards of several nonprofit organizations. Mainly, he listens to birds at night.
Ted Floyd

Latest posts by Ted Floyd (see all)

  • Frank Izaguirre

    How about gray-cheeked thrushes on the Pittsburgh CBC?

    • Ted Floyd

      Haha. And here’s a thought: Sure, those records probably pertain to Hermit Thrush…but which subspecies? If you’re familiar only with the bright and reddish Hermit Thrushes of eastern and northern North America, you’d be excused for being puzzled by the colder and grayer Hermit Thrushes of the Interior West; the latter are migratory, of course, and do wander east at least a bit. Anyhow, I’ve wondered if the Pgh Gray-cheeks were auduboni Hermit Thrushes.

  • Matt Brady

    Hammonds vs Dusky Flycatcher in August.

  • Walter Wehtje

    In coastal California, a summer Ruby-crowned Kinglet is a Hutton’s Vireo.

    • Ted Floyd

      And in Nevada, a Hutton’s Vireo is a Ruby-crowned Kinglet… 🙂

  • Pingback: Birding Online: August 2016 « ABA Publications()

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