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Introducing the 2017 Bird of the Year!

It’s the moment that surely dozens of you have been looking forward to for hours now, the announcement of the ABA’s 2017 Bird of the Year. The 2016 Bird of the Year, Chestnut-collared Longspur, was a departure from past choices, a bird that is a bit mysterious and requires a specific ecosystem in a specific part of the continent. This year’s bird is the opposite, one that thrives in a variety of coastal habitats and a bird that is familiar not only to ABA members, but to birders around the world.

So without too much more of an introduction, here’s your 2017 Bird of the Year, Ruddy Turnstone! We’d also like to thank our 2017 Bird of the Year artist, Sophie Webb, for this beautiful painting that will grace the cover of the February 2017 issue of Birding magazine.

Get more information on this bird at our Bird of the Year page, and look for an interview with Sophie Webb on the next episode of the American Birding Podcast.

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Nate Swick

Nate Swick

Editor, Social Media Manager at American Birding Association
Nate Swick is the editor of the American Birding Association Blog, social media manager for the ABA, and the host of the American Birding Podcast. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Danielle, and two young children. He is the author of Birding for the Curious and The ABA Field Guide to Birds of the Carolinas.
Nate Swick

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  • L E Beegle

    The Ruddy Turnstone is a wonderful choice as Bird of the Year for 2017. Here is a bird that we can point to when at the beach and talk to those who say “What are you doing?” We can open a conversation with non-birders about conservation and care of our beaches and wild birds, as we show them the colorful bird. Even the winter plumage of the RUTU is interesting, and the breeding plumage is amazing. Plus, the RUTU is entertaining! I’ve seen them walk right past people on the rock jetty walkway at Lighthouse Point Park in Volusia County, Florida.

American Birding Podcast
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