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American Birding Podcast: Lang Elliott on Natural Soundscapes

The next episode of the American Birding Podcast is out!

I’m joined by master bird recordist Lang Elliott as he talks about his new project, a sound-recording expedition to the western US.  Lang hopes to record in a wide variety of locations and habitats, and he’s documenting his journey on his website, Music of Nature, and sharing his recordings in a new podcast he has launched.

Also, ABA president Jeff Gordon checks in, reporting from eastern Pennsylvania where a Black-backed Oriole has been attracting birders from all over to a nondescript neighborhood outside of Philadelphia full of people who had a front row seat to a real birding phenomenon.

Thanks to Naturalist Journeys for sponsoring this episode.

Subscribe to the podcast at iTunes, Stitcher, and Google Play, and please leave a review if you are so inclined! It definitely helps people find us.

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Nate Swick

Nate Swick

Editor, Social Media Manager at American Birding Association
Nate Swick is the editor of the American Birding Association Blog, social media manager for the ABA, and the host of the American Birding Podcast. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Danielle, and two young children. He is the author of Birding for the Curious and The ABA Field Guide to Birds of the Carolinas.
Nate Swick

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  • Justin Cale

    What a great podcast! I love the message, and I’d love to hear more of this type of work in future podcasts 😀

  • George Lynn Paul

    Great podcast Nate! I hope many people listen to it. I like the way that you, or Lang, incorporated the birdsong recordings into the podcast. Love it! I do hope Lang is able to record some soundscapes out here. I recorded with him in New York once, and he introduced me to his SASS set up. I am going to write him and see if he is coming this way. Great having a podcast like this for the ABA.

    • Thanks, George!

  • Orin Keplinger

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/039c6d7e35767df6de7189a661c988f0a321be21e74efc23893b73c28995cb36.jpg Sunrise over Picasaw Creek in Boone County, IL

    Hey, Nate: Excellent podcast with Lang E. and Jeff G. I love going into the deep woods and searching during Jan-March period for nest building Woodpeckers. Then in April, in Rockford, IL we start looking for Mississippi Kites. This combination is great for giving purpose to the beginning of Winter and Spring. Our local Eagle Nest near Belvidere, IL, is also an ongoing joy that never fails to please. My own preference is to photograph and record all these birds from a respectful distance using my 90mm Stellarvue telescope, and various cameras and digital recorders. The deep woods often requires extra gear like camo, repellant, branch clippers, folding chair, etc. But the sounds are more natural out there away from traffic, etc… and it’s fun to have the local fauna walk in unawares and be surprised – if they see me at all. The telescope and camera do double duty as I also use them for astrophotography, and dictate my sightings on the recorders during the long nights. It’s a wonderfully quiet, but natural world out there, and especially nice when I can find a walking, outdoors gal with whom to enjoy it.
    As Ever, Orin Keplinger, near Chicago, but currently in CA visiting relatives.
    E) [email protected]

    P.S. the cell phone service in Marin County is an unmitigated disaster, even for the locals

    • Thanks, Orin. You’re right, looking for woodpeckers and hawks nest-building and preparing is a great way to enjoy the late winter lull.

  • Seti Smith

    An insightful podcast about birding within a larger life context.

    It’s inspiring to hear how Lang Elliot overcame auditory challenges and now shares his sound discoveries.

    And it’s good to know that people like Tom and Linda Binder exist. Their openness to new experiences and their acceptance of the human and natural interactions that resulted are refreshing. I’m glad the ABA recognized the value of sharing the Binders well spoken thoughts. Thanks!

    • Thanks, Seti! I also really enjoyed the Binders’ comments. It’s really wonderful to hear people who “get” birding even if they come from outside what we think of as the birding community.

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