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Rare Bird Alert: April 14, 2017

Into mid-April, and the listservs across the continent are buzzing with reports of returning migrants. But there are still a few birds moving to places where they don’t belong, and even fewer  continuing rarities in the ABA Area. The continuing Black-backed Oriole in Pennsylvania was seen into the beginning of the past week, but has not been seen in a few days as of the composing of this post. Both Tufted Flycatcher (ABA Code 5) and Streak-backed Oriole remain in Arizona. The Redwing (4) in British Columbia is now singing, and there continue to be a couple Pink-footed Geese (4) here and there in the northeast.

There are few places in the ABA Area more attractive to be in mid-April than Florida, which saw some incredible Caribbean strays this week in addition to the return of migrants from those islands. The first was a vCuban Pewee in Miami-Dade, which was followed a day later by a Loggerhead Kingbird (5), also in Miami-Dade. Then, one day later, a Cuban Vireo (not yet accepted) – potentially the same bird as last year but who knows – turned up in Monroe. And if that wasn’t enough, a Black Noddy  was seen among the tern colony in the Dry Tortogas, making for a truly exceptional week.

This Cuban Pewee turned out to be the first of three back to back to back megas in south Florida this week. Photo: Nico Salino

Good birds in Texas this week include an Iceland Gull at Bolivar Flats, and a Black-billed Magpie photographed in Roberts.

In Kansas, a Painted Redstart was discovered near Dodge City.

Colorado had a Bronzed Cowbird this week in Prowers, one of fewer than five records in the state.

Adding to the noteworthy Mexican birds in Arizona, a Flame-colored Tanager was found in Cochise, near where one of the Tufted Flycatchers are nesting.

In California, a Great Shearwater was seen from a repositioning cruise in San Francisco waters.

Oregon’s 4th record of Laughing Gull was a sharp adult in Lincoln this week.

In British Columbia, a White-tailed Kite was seen near Metchosin.

Wisconsin had a Neotropic Cormorant this week in Ozaukee.

A Pine Grosbeak visiting a feeder in Winnebago, Illinois, this week is one of fewer than 10 records of the species in the state of the least 30 years.

Indiana also had a Neotropic Cormorant, in Marion. This is the third individual around the Great Lakes in the last 2 weeks.

In Ontario, a Ruff (3) was a nice find in Minesing.

Newfoundland had a Yellow-billed Loon in Trepassay this week.

An overshooting migrant Prothonotary Warbler  was discovered in Sandy Cove, Nova Scotia.

Delaware also had a Ruff (3) this week, in Port Penn.

In Maine, a Townsend’s Solitaire was found in Cumberland.

New Jersey had a “Eurasian” Whimbrel photographed in Cape May.

And in Tennessee, yet another Ruff (3), this one in Obion.

—=====—

Omissions and errors are not intended, but if you find any please message blog AT aba.org and I will try to fix them as soon as possible. This post is meant to be an account of the most recently reported birds. Continuing birds not mentioned are likely included in previous editions listed here. Place names written in italics refer to counties/parishes.

Readers should note that none of these reports has yet been vetted by a records committee. All birders are urged to submit documentation of rare sightings to the appropriate state or provincial committees. For full analysis of these and other bird observations, subscribe to North American Birds <aba.org/nab>, the richly illustrated journal of ornithological record published by the ABA.

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Nate Swick

Nate Swick

Editor, Social Media Manager at American Birding Association
Nate Swick is the editor of the American Birding Association Blog, social media manager for the ABA, and the host of the American Birding Podcast. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Danielle, and two young children. He is the author of Birding for the Curious and The ABA Field Guide to Birds of the Carolinas.
Nate Swick

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