American Birding Podcast
Birders know well that the healthiest, most dynamic choruses contain many different voices. The birding community encompasses a wide variety of interests, talents, and convictions. All are welcome.
If you like birding, we want to hear from you.
Read More »

Categories

Authors

Archives

ABA's FREE Birder's Guide

via email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow ABA on Twitter

Rockjumper Tours

aba events

Rare Bird Alert: June 14, 2019

COntinuing rare birds in the ABA Area include that long-staying Slate-throated Redstart (ABA Code 4) in Texas, as well as a more or less regular Red-footed Booby (4) in California. The Falcated Duck (4) near Anchorage, Alaska, is still being seen this week, as is the Common Crane (4) in Arizona. Both Little Egret (4) in Maine and Zenaida Dove (5) in Florida also stuck around into the week.

We’ll start with Minnesota this week, which didn’t have anything in the way of an ABA Area rarity, but boasted a nice haul at the state level including Minnesota’s 3rd record of Kirtland’s Warbler in Duluth. A Sage Thrasher in St. Louis was the state’s 14th, and a Laughing Gull in Faribault, the state’s 18th.

We’re still keeping an eye on Alaska, though some of that state’s rarities are coming from North America rather than Asia. A Snowy Plover in Cordova is the state’s 1st documented record. A more rare, at least on the continental scale, Gray Wagtail (4) in Nome proves that there are still birds to come from parts west.

Noteworthy for British Columbia this week was an Ash-throated Flycatcher in North Vancouver.

California had a female-type Garganey (4) turn up in Alameda, this week.

Idaho’s 3rd record of Brown Pelican was seen in Nez Perce, the farthest point yet of an impressive irruption of the species into the eastern Great Plains and the Great Lakes this spring.

Good for Wyoming, an Alder Flycatcher was photographed in Teton. 

New Mexico had a Buff-breasted Flycatcher in Grant, and a Black-capped Vireo in Dona Ana this week.

In Florida, a Yellow-green Vireo in Key Largo, Monroe, was a very nice find.

South Carolina had a Gray Kingbird on Sullivan’s Island in Charleston.

Pelagic birders off of Hatteras, North Carolina, had a European Storm-Petrel (4) this week.

New York’s 4th record of Bridled Tern was seen on Great Gull Island in Suffolk. 

In Ontario, Tropical/Couch’s Kingbird (leaning towards the former) was seen at Long Point.

Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks continue to turn up in the northeast, with one on Nantucket Island in Massachusetts, this week.

Vermont’s 2nd record of Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks were near the town of Orwell.

New Hampshire gets is own Little Egret (4) this week, near Rye.

Nova Scotia’s 2nd record of Lewis’s Woodpecker was seen near Halifax, and a Black-tailed Godwit (3) in Pictou.

Newfoundland also had a Black-tailed Godwit (3) this week, a sharp looking breeding bird in Renews.

—=====—

Omissions and errors are not intended, but if you find any please message blog AT aba.org and I will try to fix them as soon as possible. This post is meant to be an account of the most recently reported birds. Continuing birds not mentioned are likely included in previous editions listed here. Place names written in italics refer to counties/parishes.

Readers should note that none of these reports has yet been vetted by a records committee. All birders are urged to submit documentation of rare sightings to the appropriate state or provincial committees. For full analysis of these and other bird observations, subscribe to North American Birds, the richly illustrated journal of ornithological record published by the ABA.

Facebooktwitter
The following two tabs change content below.
Nate Swick

Nate Swick

Editor, Social Media Manager at American Birding Association
Nate Swick is the editor of the American Birding Association Blog, social media manager for the ABA, and the host of the American Birding Podcast. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Danielle, and two young children. He is the author of Birding for the Curious and The ABA Field Guide to Birds of the Carolinas.