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Blog Birding #383

The Cape May Bird Observatory’s new 21st century banding station is already seeing dividends. The researchers there are place geotrackers on some of the catches to see where they go and and how they use the landscape. David La Puma has more.

As of today, they have now been deployed on two resident species (Northern [read more…]

Blog Birding #382

There may be no wild bird species that is more readily associated with human civilization than the plucky House Sparrow, and it turns out that their evolution was driven by humans in ways we are only now beginning to understand. More at Phys.org.

House sparrows are closely associated with humans and are found in [read more…]

Blog Birding #381

At Shorebird Science, Shiloh Schulte shares what it’s like to seek the hidden nests of shorebirds on the tundra.

Good nest-finding skills are essential for our work up here on the Canning River. We are trying to retrieve satellite transmitter put out in previous years and deploy new tags on several shorebird species. In both [read more…]

Blog Birding #380

Ron Pittaway’s much-anticipated Winter Finch Report for the winter of 2018-2019 is out, and it looks like it’s going to be a good one in the east.

This is an irruption (flight) year for winter finches in the East. Cone and birch seed crops are poor to low in most of Ontario and the Northeast, [read more…]

Blog Birding #379

At The Nemesis Bird, Tim Healy tells the take of a particularly excellent New York pelagic.

Pelagic birding trips appeal to my inner explorer. Searching for wildlife on the high seas offers a special kind of thrill, an opportunity to break from more typical, terrestrial efforts and visit a realm beyond the boundaries of humanity’s [read more…]

Blog Birding #378

In this season of migration Larry at The Brownstone Birding Blog urges birder not to take the birds they do see for granted when seeking out birds you might see.

One of the advantages of using eBird is that you can look to see what people are seeing in the area and then go [read more…]

Blog Birding #377

At Avian Hybrids, a fascinating look at hybridization of sharp-tailed sparrows by Jente Ottenburghs.

Hybridization can work as an evolutionary stimulus. For example by transferring beneficial genetic variants from one species to another. This process, adaptive introgression, has been described for numerous taxa, such as butterflies and snowshoe hares. However, examples in birds are [read more…]

Blog Birding #376

Some fascinating insights on indigenous bird names by Jessica Gorzo at Avian Ecologist.

As I’ve been researching Indigenous bird names from what is currently known as North America, I’ve also been reading a book from a very different part of the world: Mount Bosavi, Papua New Guinea. It’s a musicology text, written by an [read more…]

Blog Birding #375

Birdchick, aka Sharon Stiteler, writes that the first step towards a life in birding is as simple as noticing birds.

Over the years as all sorts of passions have come about, it feels like we share our passions. Though I may not get why my adult friends are obsessed with going Disney World every [read more…]

Blog Birding #374

We don’t always think of woodpeckers as a troublesome taxonomic family, but at Avian Hybrids, Jente Ottenburghs suggests that maybe we should.

Let’s start in North America. Here, you can find one of the best studied avian hybrid zones, namely the one between red-shafted flicker (Colaptes auratus cafer) and yellow-shafted flicker (C. a. auratus). The [read more…]

American Birding Podcast
Birders know well that the healthiest, most dynamic choruses contain many different voices. The birding community encompasses a wide variety of interests, talents, and convictions. All are welcome.
If you like birding, we want to hear from you.
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