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Blog Birding #422

Martha Cartwright’s recent birding trip to the Bahamas dealt with the fallout from Hurricane Dorian. She tells the story at Birds Caribbean.

From September 1 to September 3, for those three days, the world had been watching in awe and anguish the videos coming out of Abaco and Grand Bahama Island. Friends and family [read more…]

Blog Birding #422

Birding is finding its way into the public consciousness, meaning that we are seeing more and more pieces like this one from Colin O’Conner from The Washingtonian.

A few years ago, I noticed an old classmate from high school, whom I’d known as a burly, bearded “drink and fight” type, posting pictures of birds [read more…]

Blog Birding #421

At the American Ornithological Society Blog, Stephanie DeMay explains how Red-cockaded Woodpeckers are responding to climate change.

How each species will respond to climate change is a research area full of unanswered questions, with important implications for the world our children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren will experience. These are not the questions I was hired to [read more…]

Blog Birding #420

Wind turbines in the Great Plains seems like a no-brainer, until you start to look into the impacts of the turbines on birds like prairie chickens. At The American Ornithology Society Blog, a summary of research that tries to determine whether it’s the noise or the land cover that causes these birds to avoid wind [read more…]

Blog Birding #419

The news that the US and Canada have lost nearly 3 Billion breeding birds in the last 40 years is certainly affecting. Don Torino of The Meadowlands Birding Blog argues that it should be our rallying cry.

The plummeting numbers of these birds has been slow and sinister like a disease that seems to come [read more…]

Blog Birding #418

As Bald Eagle populations continue to rebound, some pairs have to move into more developed areas to nest, causing complications for humans and eagles. Get the scoop at Phys.org.

Some eagle lovers have blocked traffic by setting up tripods in the middle of the road; others have tossed rocks at the eagles to get [read more…]

Blog Birding #417

29% of the North American birds that were present in 1970 have disappeared in the intervening 50 years, the result of the study published in Science by researchers associated with the American Birding Conservancy. The good news is that the declines are reversible. Ed Yong has more at The Atlantic.

A new study, [read more…]

Blog Birding #416

A Big Year, even a county Big Year, is a series of mini-adventures that play out over the course of 12 months. Jay Packer shares the story of an exceptional day in his Taylor County, Texas, Big Year.

We spent the next 5 and a half hours scouring the streets of Merkel. In fact, I [read more…]

Blog Birding #415

Quite a bit has been written about the decline in insect numbers and diversity, but less about what it might mean for birds. At the American Bird Conservancy, Howard Youth considers the fallout.

The clues in this mystery include large-scale disappearance of insects, dipping bird populations, and a line-up of potential culprits including pesticides, habitat [read more…]

Blog Birding #414

Crows that feed regularly on human food tend to have higher cholesterol than those that don’t. Kaeli Swift at Corvid Research explains what that might or might not mean for them.

I’d wager that most people don’t think about this behavior beyond simply finding it amusing or annoying, but I suspect that if you describe [read more…]