American Birding Podcast
Birders know well that the healthiest, most dynamic choruses contain many different voices. The birding community encompasses a wide variety of interests, talents, and convictions. All are welcome.
If you like birding, we want to hear from you.
Read More »

Categories

Authors

Archives

ABA's FREE Birder's Guide

via email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow ABA on Twitter


Rockjumper Tours

Happening NOW: North American Birds Changes are Upon Us

Mid-summer is well upon us. Post-breeding dispersal is underway at this writing and shorebird migration has begun, while rarities continue to pepper the North American continent. These have ranged from local notables to the mind-numbingly exciting Antillean Palm-Swift in Florida. There are a great number of exhilarating and worthy avian topics for this installment of [read more…]

Rare Bird Alert: July 19, 2019

Sorry for the late publication. It’s been a pretty exhausting 24 hours involving cancelled flights, lost laptops, and a very late arrival at home for me following an otherwise extraordinary visit to Newfoundland. I’ll keep all this short and sweet. Continuing rarities include the Slate-throated Redstart (ABA Code 4) in Texas, the Red-footed Booby (4) [read more…]

How to Know the Birds: No. 12, Merganser Musings

The adult male, or “drake,” hooded merganser, Lophodotyes cucullatus, has got to be just about the most ridiculously photogenic bird in the ABA Area. No matter how often I see one—the species has been expanding its range and increasing in number for several decades now—I can’t help myself. I have to take a picture. Like [read more…]

Rare Bird Alert: July 12, 2019

Many noteworthy ABA Area rarities look like they’re sticking it in for the summer, including the Slate-throated Redstart (ABA Code 4) in Texas, Red-footed Booby (4) in California , and Falcated Duck (4) in Alaska. Little Egrets (4) are still being seen in Maine, and the Common Crane (4) i northern Arizona is also evidently [read more…]

American Birding Podcast: Letters from Bird Camp with Jennie Duberstein & Robert Buckert

The ABA’s summer camps have long been an avenue for young birders to take in some excellent birding opportunities, to network with other young birders, and to learn about career opportunities in birding and ornithology. So many young people who have gone on to become influential in our community have come through ABA camps and [read more…]

2019 Duck Stamps Available NOW through the ABA Store

For the last few years, we at the ABA made the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, known far and wide as the Duck Stamp, available through our own store. We hoped this would give birders an opportunity to vote, as it were, for how they want their voices to be heard as consumers of [read more…]

Blog Birding #409

Duck genetics are a real mess, as any park pond will quickly make clear, and even birds we consider to be “good” species are closer than we imagine, as Jente Ottenburghs at Avian Hybrids explains.

Philip Lavrestsky and his colleagues sequenced the DNA of five members from the Mallard complex that occur in North America: [read more…]

Rare Bird Alert: July 5, 2019

This past June was recently designated as the warmest ever in recorded history. This past month also had an extraordinary irruption of southern species into northern parts of the ABA Area. It probably oversimplifies the mechanisms that lead to bird vagrancy to lay that entirely at the feet of climate change, but the two phenomena [read more…]

How to Know the Birds: No. 11, Beware Expectation

I was leading a field trip a couple weeks ago, and our group came across this bird:

Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado; June 16, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

One of the trip participants needed Hammond’s flycatcher for his county list, and we were at a good elevation—and a good part of [read more…]

Blog Birding #408

What’s the deal with feeding jelly to birds? Is it harmful? Laura Erickson has the answers.

In 2004, when I had exceptionally high numbers of orioles, Cape May Warblers, and catbirds coming to my grape jelly, people were finding dead orioles and warblers in the woods—there simply wasn’t enough natural food to support the large [read more…]