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Bald Eagle Eats Whale!

OK, maybe the headline is hyped a bit ala The National Enquirer but my enquiring mind was certainly impressed with the gastric ambition of a pair of eagles I saw at Kalaloch Beach, Olympic National Park last week.  The night’s high tide had sadly deposited a baby Harbor Porpoise along the wrack line (thanks to Katie Jones, naturalist for Western Prince Whale & Wildlife Tours, for the ID.)

A pair of adult Bald Eagles thought that was just dandy, though, and while one tucked in the other waited down nearer the water for its turn.  Bald Eagles are pretty famous for their opportunistic feeding habits including fishing, aggressive predation of significant-sized prey (like Sandhill Crane), kleptoparasitism, and scavenging.  So even though finding them eating a washed up porpoise isn’t groundbreaking, I thought it was pretty cool (probably my landlocked Colorado perspective on things made it even more special for me.)  If you want to play along, leave a comment with an interesting Bald Eagle dietary story of your own!

BAEA_hikers

Some nearby hikers prompted the Bald Eagle to move the baby porpoise down the beach a bit.  It couldn’t get the carcass completely airborne but I was duly impressed with the bird’s lifting power- it ended up dragging its meal about 50 meters closer to the surf, leaving a very cryptic trail along the beach.

PorpoiseTrail

When the eagles were done I snapped this pic showing the dragging trail leading down the beach.  Stow that one away in your mental animal-tracking files!

BAEA_porpoise_lr1
Porpoise flipper- it’s what’s for breakfast!

BAEA_gape
That gape was made for gulping!

BAEA_hop
A little repositioning hop shows off the business end of the Bald Eagle’s feet quite well.

BAEA_takeoff
Sated, the eagle heads off for some serious digesting.

Hey- as you read this I’ll be aboard the National Geographic Explorer poking around Iceland & Greenland.  I was incredibly fortunate to be chosen as a Grosvenor Teacher Fellow this year, heading to the arctic to share the importance of geographic education and climate change awareness with guests.  I hope to do my share of bird-finding for folks too!!  My role will also include working on curriculum & outreach when I return.   Stay tuned for (hopefully!) some bird & wildlife pics when I get back.  I promise I won’t lobby too hard about including Iceland & Greenland in the ABA area!  -Bill

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