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Your turn: Birding Nunavut’s Cambridge Bay

You can’t drive to Nunavut. There are no roads connecting it with the rest of North America, and much of Canada’s newest territory consists of islands in the Arctic Ocean. Nunavut comprises over 20% of Canada’s land mass yet is home to only 0.09% of Canada’s population. That’s not nine percent, but nine hundredths of a percent. So it is of little doubt that Nunavut is the least-visited of Canada’s provinces and territories by ABA members.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. Jim Richards got the itch just over 30 years ago, and he’s been going back ever since. In fact, he literally wrote the book on Nunavut, having coauthored the territory’s bird checklist. The March 2014 issue of Birder’s Guide to Travel features an article by Jim called “Far From Home but Close to Perfect: Birding Nunavut’s Cambridge Bay“. Inside you will find his invaluable tips for making your trip there a not just a reality, but a success: from where to go, where to stay, whom to call for a rental vehicle, and maps of the best local birding locations.

You can read Jim’s article by clicking here. The entire issue of Birder’s Guide to Travel is available online and for free. Once the e-magazine has downloaded, just turn to page 12. You can download the entire issue, or just Jim’s article, by clicking on the fourth button from the right in the toolbar above the magazine’s pages. That way you can conveniently reference the article–and Cindy Lippincott’s wonderful maps of the region–on your smartphone as you trudge about the Arctic tundra between sightings of Yellow-billed Loon and King Eider.

Nunavut is huge, and Jim touches on just one of its many birding locations. Do you have a favorite birding location in Nunavut you’d like to share? An experience you want to tell us about? A comment or question about the article? Please offer them in the comment section, below!

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